Saturday, 17 November 2018

C Columns

Soul Pantry Sustenance in Your Spiritual Cupboard

By  Bethany  Riehl

I  have  this  picture  on  my  Instagram  feed  from  last  spring.  It’s  a  stack  of  “sugar  detox”  cookbooks...with  a  handful  of  gummy  bears  resting  on  top.  Obviously,  my  research  into  the  topic  was  going  well.  It’s  one  thing  to  read  along  and  agree  with  how  I  should  eat  and quite  another  to  stock  my  pantry  with  healthy  food  while  keeping  the  junk  far  away.

Many  years  (and  pounds)  ago,  my  husband  and  I  watched  a  show  called  The  Biggest  Loser  once  a  week.  Remember  that  one?  A  show  about  overweight  people  who  were  chosen  to  live  on  a  campus  away  from  home  and,  under  the  supervision  of  trainers  and  doctors,  were  put  on  a  strict  diet  and  exercise  regime  for  several  months.  We  as  a  nation  watched  the  tears  pile  up  and  the  pounds  melt  away.  

On  the  nights  that  the  show  aired,  I  would  head  to  our  local  gas  station  for  candy  and  chips,  or  to  Arctic  Circle  for  shakes,  and  we  would  watch  this  show  meant  to  inspire  us  to eat  well,  while  stuffing  our  faces  with  junk  food.  It  was  glorious.  Show  of  hands  for  everyone  else  who  did  that.  Yes,  I  imagine  there  are  plenty  of  you  as,  over  the  years,  I’ve  learned  that  nearly  all  of  my  friends  had  the  same  tradition.  

So  why  bring  up  these  bad  habits  of  my  past?  As  I'm  writing  this,  it's  the  middle  of  summer  when,  in  my  opinion,  it  is  the  easiest  time  of  the  year  to  eat  healthy.  The  farmers' markets  are  open,  grocery  stores  are  stocked  with  delicious,  fresh  vegetables  and  fruits,  not  to  mention  many  home  gardens  are  flourishing.  But  now,  the  air  is  getting  that  bite  we  all  crave  in  mid-summer  heat,  school  is  in  full  swing,  and  we’re  settling  in  for  a  season  of  cozying  up  indoors.  Before  we  know  it,  eating  well  will  take  much  more  thought  and  intentionality  than  it  does  right  now.  

As  I  sat  that  day,  reading  articles  about  what  sugar  does  to  your  body  while  eating  a  bag  of  gummy  bears,  I  was  doing  nothing  more  than  agreeing  with  the  authors  while  not  doing  a  single  thing  to  implement  new  habits.  Obviously  I  recognized  the  hypocrisy  or  I  wouldn’t  have  documented  it.  

My  pastor  said  something  a  few  months  ago  that  made  me  realize  how  much  this  hypocrisy  can  occur  in  my  spiritual  life  as  well.  He  said  that  agreeing  with  the  Bible  does  not  mean  the  same  as  doing  what  it  says.  

Yowza.  How  true  that  can  be.  

I  may  agree  with  the  command  to  love  one  another,  but  do  I  put  that  into  practice  while driving  down  Eagle  Road  during  rush  hour?  My  kids  can  attest  that  my  attitude  is  less  than  loving  in  those  moments.  “Oh,  come  on!”  might  be  a  common  phrase  from  the  driver’s  seat.

I  may  agree  that  it  is  good  to  not  allow  any  unwholesome  talk  come  out  of  my  mouth,  but  what  about  off-color  television  shows  that  I  find  myself  laughing  at?  I  may  not  be  speaking  ugly  things,  but  I’m  definitely  allowing  myself  to  be  entertained  by  them.  

I  may  agree  that  He  gives  peace  that  passes  all  understanding,  but  am  I  truly  leaning  into  that,  or  am  I  picking  up  my  problems  to  worry  over  them  until  my  nerves  are  in  tatters?  

Agreeing  with  Him  and  living  for  Him  are  two  separate,  important,  intentional  things.  

In  the  same  way  that  eating  well  comes  naturally  when  the  vine  is  lush  with  ripe  fruit  and  much  harder  when  the  seasonal  offerings  are  not  as  appetizing  (hello,  watermelon  season  vs  butternut  squash  season),  so  is  living  for  Him  much  more  natural  when  life  is  full  and  easy.  And  much  harder  when  He’s  requiring  me  to  put  my  faith  into  action.

Eating  well  takes  training  and  self-control  to  override  cravings.  Our  bodies  need  whole  foods  for  nourishment,  but  our  taste  buds  and  emotions  have  been  tricked  by  “frankenfoods”  and  we  typically  choose  chips  and  queso  over  veggies  and  hummus.  No?  Just  me?  

In  the  same  way,  our  souls  have  been  tricked  into  relying  on  our  own  wisdom,  the  tides of  the  culture,  and  diet  Christianity  instead  of  feeding  on  the  Word  of  God.  It  takes  intentionality  and  diligence  and  a  great  deal  of  faith  to  absorb  God’s  Word  and  then  live  by  it.  

It’s  not  easy,  but  it’s  possible  simply  because  it’s  what  we  were  created  to  do.  Serve  Him.  Worship  Him.  Love  Him.

Next  time  I  think  about  cutting  out  the  sugar,  I’ll  have  to  leave  the  gummy  bears  out  of  the  equation.  And  the  next  time  I  find  myself  grumping  about  yet  another  car  that  cuts  me off,  I  will  choose  to  remember  that  when  Jesus  said  to  love  my  neighbor,  He  meant  it.

Bethany  Riehl  loves  to  write  stories  and  articles  that  explore  the  complexities  of  relationships  and  encourage  readers  in  their  relationship  with  Jesus.  She  joyfully  serves  in  the  children’s  ministry  at  her  church,  teaches  at  a  homeschool  co-op,  and  drinks  more  coffee  than  necessary  to  keep  up  with  her  only-slightly-crazy  life.  She  is  the  author  of  four  Christian  fiction  novels  and  lives  in  Kuna  with  her  spunky  kids  and  very  handsome  hubby. 

 

Christian Living Magazine

Email:

boisechristianliving@gmail.com

Phone: 208-703-7860